Vintage Blades

Restoring a Razor

  • 1. The Initial Condition

    Is it still possible to restore it? After taking apart the old razor and assessing the blade in detail, the real condition shows. Here you see two razors. One of them taken apart.

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  • 2. Cleaning the Blade

    Before any corrective actions can be done, all rust and other residue need to be removed. Here the blade is being brushed with a brass brushed. Long hours of work lying ahead.

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  • 3. Sanding by Hand

    This step is the core of the whole restoration process. The blade will be treated with sandpaper by hand for many hours until all decay is gone and the blade is shiny again.

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  • 4. Polishing

    Sanding the blade with finer grits of sandpaper can be also considered as polishing. But as last step it will be polished with a soft cloth and different polish pastes to bring the best shine result.

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  • 5. The Scales

    New scales made by nice wood bring the new look to perfection. The rough shape of the scales needs to be cut out by a fretsaw. The wood on this picture is black sandal wood.

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  • 6. Shaping the Scales

    To get closer to the final shape both sides of the scales will be bit-by-bit fitted with a file and sandpaper. Important is to keep both sides exactly the same.

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  • 7. Polishing Wood

    The right combination of the sandpaper grits, the right way brings out the beauty of the material. Here you see one side only brought into the right shape, while the other side is already polished.

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  • 8. Drilling

    Later all parts will be fixed by rivets, for this very exact and fine holes need to be drilled in both sides of the scales.

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  • 9. The Wedge

    A wedge is the middle part between the two sides of the scale. It needs to be fitted in its angle and together with the scales. This wedge is made out of African red sandalwood.

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  • 10. Pinning

    All parts are now prepared for reassembly of the razor. Pins will be finally set to connect blade and scales. Mostly silver-steel or brass will be used.

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  • 11. Honing

    Every blade will be sharpened and honed in a multi step process. Different wet- stones have to be used. Sharpness test and checks under the microscope will show in the end the sharpness of this razor.

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  • 12. Stropping

    After being already on Shave ready level, the last step is the stropping on leather. Many times the blade will be stropped from both sides to ensure the optimal shaving experience. See here the Stropping “Guide”.

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Latest News

Before & After

  • After: 

    Original Schulze Weyer "Deutsche Arbeit" 4/8“, Solingen.  The razor was in quite good condition, so the scales could be kept, not too much patina needed to be removed and the blade was good to hone and get ready again.

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  • Before:

    Original Schulze Weyer "Deutsche Arbeit" 4/8“, Solingen. A nice razor in original aluminium scales, which had a real high Pre-WWII. If the the razor is because of that from before '45  or maybe late 50ties is unclear.

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  • After:

    The Tagore 23 Oldehove after the refurbishment. Oldehove is in today's Netherlands. But it is somehow connected to Solingen. A buy-over of a brand-name? Transferred technology? The razor was in any case under the Name Tagore a tribute to the Indian Philosopher.

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  • Before:

    A Tagore 23 Oldehove in good conditions with a 4/8" blade. The blade need some hours sanding and polishing and there is a tiny chip.  After some hours, ready to shave again.

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  • Before:

    A very interesting razor with obviously some history: A. Kneinknecht 198 from Erlangen Germany, size 5/8”.

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  • After:

    Interesting were following points: Case and blade are original, the scales must have been replaced some time ago (Schulze, Solingen), while Erlangen is located in Bavaria. Nevertheless: A real beauty!

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  • Before: Finke

    Rich Finke /Chemnitz - Weltmeister: This razor didn't look appealing anymore. But it revealed some history: Chemnitz didn't have this name from 1953 -1990. It cannot be that this has been produced after 1990. So it must have been before the communists came.

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  • After: Finke

    With that it is very much likely, that the scales have been replaced with cheap material during that time of communist regime. Now in bamboo and fully polished, sharp and ready to shave.

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  • Before:

    The Friedrich Herder No.77 in original condition how i found it in Hongkong. The scales were not the nicest, but the substance of the blade amazing, so I decided to invest enough time to bring it not only back to live but back to it's prime.

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  • After:

    Here the Friedrich Herder No.77 again. One of my favorite ones. It is big, has the nice slight smile and looks now in black sandalwood and silver steel rivets just slick. The well fitting wedge is made by red wood for the contrast.

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  • Before:

    C.V. heljestrand Ekilstuna, Sweden - 11/16“, before 1940: broken scales and a tiny chip in the blade demanded a complete makeover. With a that small chip like this is possible to rescue the blade with any impact. A very small part will be taken away and then brought to initial sharpness.

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  • After: 

    C.V. Heljestrand Ekilstuna, Sweden - 11/16“, before 1940: After a more intensiv restoration again mirror shiny in black sandal wood scales. The blade need to be carefully refurbished since it is very thin. It does not have in that extend the classical hollow ground but rather a consistent thickness.

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